Timeline

Horror Films 1895 – 1899

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Horror Films 1895 – 1899

This period was dominated by George Melies and George Albert Smith who was responsible for much of the cinematography.

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Horror Films 1900 – 1909

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1900 – 1909

The dawn of the 20th Century saw more development. Running times were increasing and the  films became more ambitious.

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Horror Films 1910 -1919

November 30, 2013

Horror Films   1910 -1919

Many of the horror films of this era were based on classic novels. 1910 saw the first adaptation of Frankenstein and 1913 the first ever Werewolf film.

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Horror Films 1920 – 1924

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1920 – 1924

The Cabinet of Dr Caligari was possibly the first true horror movie to be made. Then in 1922 with the making of Nosferatu we saw the first ever vampire movie.

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Horror Films 1925 – 1929

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1925 – 1929

The period is notable for bringing us in 1925 Phantom of the Opera. This started a love affair with the subject which is still with us today.

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Horror Films 1930 – 1934

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1930 – 1934

The period when horror came of age and became commercial. We had The Mummy, Frankenstein and maybe the underrated White Zombie. Karloff and Lugosi and of course Tod Browning’s controversial film Freaks. The films had plots and for the time they were made,  looked good. A taste of things to come.

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Horror Films 1935 – 1939

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1935 – 1939

More classics and the arrival of the sequel with Bride of Frankenstein. The Raven gave us one of the best Karloff – Lugosi encounters and of course the unforgettable Peter Lorre in Mad Love. Werewolf of London and one of the greatest female talents that never received the credit she deserved. Valerie Hobson. A career that was to end in controversy and her playing the role of her life as the loyal wife.  

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Horror Films 1940- 1944

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1940- 1944

More of the same. Invisible sequels, more mummy films and not to be left out Frankenstein. Every backdrop that could possibly be used for horror. Notable for the future was the arrival of Alfred Hitchcock as a director. The future was assured.

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Horror Films 1945 – 1949

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1945 – 1949

The changing of the guard. We saw Spellbound from Alfred Hitchcock and some of the last films from Robert Florey before he moved to the growing popularity of television. Frankenstein got another airing but this time as a vehicle for the popular comedy duo Abbott & Costello. They were to…

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Horror Films 1950 – 1954

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1950 – 1954

The period was not memorable for horror as we saw a host of creature films thanks to Jack Arnold who brought a mixture of sci-fi/ horror. Some films were entertaining, namely Them and depending on taste the Godzilla films. Abbott & Costello gave the Invisible Man another airing, but most note worthy  was the arrival of Vincent Price in House of Wax. We had what was to be another true horror actor. Like the past., the way he spoke  sent chills down the spine.

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Horror Films 1955 – 1959

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1955 – 1959

We had the Fly and the Return of the Fly with Vincent Price. Back came  Frankenstein and the Mummy. Words came back into film titles that we had come to expect from past incarnations, macabre, blood, zombies, werewolves and more. Val Guest also introduced us to the Quatermass character through a series of films which were to lead to TV adaptations and for a while proved popular with young and old alike.

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Horror Films 1960 – 1964

November 30, 2013

Horror Films 1960 – 1964

The period gave us films of the quality of Psycho and the Birds, both by Hitchcock and of course Whatever Happened to Baby Jane. We also had the remake of the Old Dark House, originally from James Whale back in the 1930’s. There was also the Raven, a film with Boris Karloff. He also starred in the Lew Landers 1935 film of the same name.

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